Certification Programme in

Humanitarian Logistics

LEARN MORE

CHL is aimed at people who work (or aspire to work) within humanitarian aid organizations in (or interacting with) supply functions, typically involving warehousing, transport and/or inventory.

The self- paced distance learning is designed specifically for those presently working, often in deep field locations, with busy schedules, and require flexibility in their learning schedules. There are no academic pre-requisites to joining the programmes.

Ce cours peut être étudié en français.

What are the benefits?

For the: Student

Professional training based on best practices

Broad understanding of the supply chain, its functions and how it fits into the overarching humanitarian organisations and response

Increased skill and confidence level

Standard vocabulary and common understanding world-wide

Internationally-recognised professional qualification from CILT (UK)

For the: Organisation

Improved programmes support and achievement of organizational goals

Increased motivation and retention of key personnel

More ownership and responsibility to find solutions taken at the field level

Increased collaboration and understanding throughout the organization and with its partners

Ultimately results in improved service to end beneficiaries

For the: Humanitarian Community

Raises the profile of logistics internally and externally

Establishes a community of professionals world-wide

Creates common processes, standards and vocabulary across organisations

Supports retention of institutional knowledge to enable continuous improvements

Ultimately results in improved service to end beneficiaries

How will you learn?

CHL uses the innovative ‘competence model approach, which emphasizes application of skills, as opposed to the examination of knowledge. At the start of the course, the candidate (or student) is inserted into a realistic scenario in which they have to advise on and manage logistics functions. The tasks that they are requested to do are designed to facilitate the development of the required skills or the demonstration of experience, as defined in the competence model.

Throughout the programmes, which is administered by Logistics Learning Alliance (LLA), candidates are supported by coaches experienced in humanitarian logistics. The team at LLA also assess candidates’ assignments and determine when they are ready to proceed to the next unit.

Candidates should expect to take 18 months to complete the programmes, studying approximately 5 hours per week. During that time, a portfolio documenting the candidate’s achievements and skills is collated for submission at the end of the programmes to the awarding body (CILT-UK) for final assessment.

How will you learn?

CHL uses the innovative ‘competence model approach, which emphasizes application of skills, as opposed to the examination of knowledge. At the start of the course, the candidate (or student) is inserted into a realistic scenario in which they have to advise on and manage logistics functions. The tasks that they are requested to do are designed to facilitate the development of the required skills or the demonstration of experience, as defined in the competence model.

Throughout the programmes, which is administered by Logistics Learning Alliance (LLA), candidates are supported by coaches experienced in humanitarian logistics. The team at LLA also assess candidates’ assignments and determine when they are ready to proceed to the next unit.

Candidates should expect to take 18 months to complete the programmes, studying approximately 5 hours per week. During that time, a portfolio documenting the candidate’s achievements and skills is collated for submission at the end of the programmes to the awarding body (CILT-UK) for final assessment.

What will you learn?

Unit 1: Humanitarian Supply Chains

The first unit introduces the world of humanitarian aid and specifically the operation of the supply chain in enabling humanitarian organizations to achieve their aims and objectives.

The situations and places in the world where humanitarian aid is required
The objectives and activities of humanitarian organizations and other participants
Supporting beneficiary service programmes
The role of logistics and supply chain management in humanitarian aid
Preparing humanitarian supply chains
Improving humanitarian supply chains

Unit 2: Warehousing and Inventory

The role of warehouse and inventory management is to make the goods available to be delivered. To help with making the goods available, warehouses are used to store goods between the times of delivery from suppliers until the goods are required to be delivered into the next stage in the supply chain and, ultimately, to the beneficiaries. The function of warehouse and inventory management;

Setting up a warehouse
Managing warehouse operations
The provision and care of warehouse operations
Managing inventory

Unit 3: Procurement

Procurement is a key part of the supply chain process; it ensures that required good and services are sourced and obtained. To achieve this, it is important that people carrying out procurement build relationships with people who are requesting goods and services as well as with the suppliers who provide the goods and services.

The function of procurement and the procurement process
The sourcing of goods and services
The different stages of the procurement process
Progress monitoring and control
Monitoring of supplier performance
Management of risk in international transactions
The requirements of international trade and commerce including INCO terms
The documentation used when importing and exporting

Unit 4: Transport

The unit looks at aspects of international and local movements and the modes of transport available. It considers the role of third parties in assisting in the movements and in the use of outsourced transport providers. International and local movements;

The different modes of transport available and their respective characteristics
The role of third parties and of third party transport providers
The nature of transport movements
The goods to be moved and their planning and scheduling

Unit 5: Fleet Management

This unit examines the function of fleet management in humanitarian supply chains, the selection of vehicles and equipment and the setting up of systems and procedures necessary to monitor and manage a fleet of vehicles.

The function of fleet management
Fleet management systems and procedures
Planning a fleet to meet programmes needs
Processes for selecting suitable vehicles, equipment and facilities
Procedures for repair and maintenance and the value of preventative maintenance systems
Systems for measuring and monitoring the performance of the fleet
Recruitment selection and management of drivers
Compliance with legislation and security requirements
The management of non-vehicle assets

Unit 6: Cash Transfer Programming (CTP)

Cash transfer programming (CTP) is the standard term used to refer to humanitarian programmes using cash or vouchers as the mode for assisting beneficiaries in preference to direct aid.

Assessments, Analyses, & Building to Decision Making
The Retail Market Assessment
The Procurement Options Analysis
The Operational Design Options Analysis
Feeding into the Programme Analyses
CTP & Competitive Procurement
Monitoring CTP
Working with Others

Unit 7: Managing a Humanitarian Supply Chain Response

If humanitarian operations are to successfully meet the twin needs of achieving what they are planned to do within the resources allocated, there needs to be good management.

Previous units looked at setting up and operating warehouses, managing transport, procuring goods and services, setting up and managing a fleet, and importing and exporting goods. This unit looks at how the different elements of logistics and supply chain are brought together, along with techniques to manage the operational resources and personnel involved.

Course Fee & Registration

The fee includes all course materials, coach support and final assessment.
For details of the current course fees and payment options please press the button below button:

Registration may be done at any time through HLC certification, by clicking on the button below:

For further information please contact hlcregistrations at: hlcregistrations@logisticslearningalliance.com

Testimonial

“Completing this course has given me the confidence to seek work in this field. I feel like I have been well equipped with a sound understanding of how this operations work as well as an idea of how practicalities could turn out (given the simulation nature of the course). Further, I have a highly recognisable qualification, which is considered an industry standard and very highly regarded within the field. I found the course highly enjoyable and interesting. I always felt really well supported and really appreciated the flexibility that was afforded me in completing the course.”

Lauren Barnard
CHL Graduate

Testimonial

”I believe the course has imparted some excellent skills that I have applied in each new role that I’ve undertaken (even though they have all been outside the field of humanitarian logistics). I had very little understanding of this area when I first started out and I feel like the course gave me an incredible overview of the entire supply chain. For me it is important to have an idea of all aspects of the supply chain and how they interact so I found the whole course relevant. All tasks were well designed – each one built on the other and created a logical ‘story’ I have adapted my general approach to project management as I found many of the lessons learnt relevant and applicable to general project management and, therefore, the various roles I have been in even though they were all outside the field of humanitarian logistics. Tasks could generally be completed in a day to a week depending on complexity and coverage.

Completing this course has given me the confidence to seek work in this field. I feel like I have been well equipped with a sound understanding of how this operations work as well as an idea of how practicalities could turn out (given the simulation nature of the course). Further, I have a highly recognisable qualification, which is considered an industry standard and very highly regarded within the field. I found the course highly enjoyable and interesting. I always felt really well supported and really appreciated the flexibility that was afforded me in completing the course.”

Lauren Barnard
CHL Graduate